Carrie Diaz Eaton

Carrie Diaz Eaton obtained her BA in Mathematics with a Minor in Zoology and a MA in Interdisciplinary Mathematics with a concentration in Biology from the University of Maine. She then obtained her PhD in Mathematics from the University of Tennessee with a concentration in Mathematical Ecology and Evolutionary Theory. While at the University of Tennessee, she was awarded both the departmental and university-wide teaching awards for graduate teaching assistants. Carrie is both an Mark A. Musik SREB Fellow and a Project NExT Fellow. She currently serves as Education co-chair for the Society of Mathematical Biology and the Electronic Communications chair of the Biology Special Interest group of the Mathematical Association of America. Diaz Eaton also serves as an Advisory Board Member for BioMAAP, as a Steering Committee member of the Mathematical Modeling Hub, and as an editorial board member for Letters in Biomathematics and PRIMUS. She is a wife and mother of two, Gabriel (10) and Yudani (7).

Carrie Diaz Eaton is an Associate Professor of Mathematics at Unity College in the School for Environmental CItizenship. Her research interests are at the interface of mathematics and biology, including computational neurobiology (neural networks), ecological evolution (community co-evolution), and research with undergraduates in modeling disease ecology. She teaches a variety of foundational mathematics courses for life and environmental science students. This work has informed a vibrant research program using multi-disciplinary collaboration to improve quantitative biology education. In 2012, she co-founded the network QUBES (Quantitative Undergraduate Biology and Synthesis). In 2014 QUBES initiated an NSF IUSE Ideas Lab collaboration to holistically address support for teaching improvement, launching a website (qubeshub.org) and faculty mentoring networks. The QUBES Consortium she now manages includes over 70 partners who work together to support faculty teaching at the interface of mathematics and biology. Carrie also co-founded a GTA professional development and mentoring program during her time in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Tennessee and currently co-leads project called “Math Mamas,” a collaboration with AWM, AMS, and the Journal of Humanistic Mathematics to bring diverse storylines of mothers in mathematics to a wider community. She is also a co-editor on two special issues for PRIMUS on Interdisciplinary Conversations and in Mathematical Biology Education.

“I acknowledge the role of supportive communities and mentors in my life and challenge myself to give back and provide that access for others.  I am a lifetime member of SACNAS. I also regularly volunteer as a mentor for the Society of Mathematical Biology and answer requests to volunteer for the SREB who so generously supported much of my PhD work (see one of my blog posts here). My success as a Latina is fundamentally connected to my professional work, both focused on equality through facilitating access to information and offering support and resources. Lathisms is a phenomenal project. I thank all of the organizers for their community work, and I am honored to be a part of how they are changing the storyline.”

-Carrie Diaz Eaton